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20 Best British Literary Podcasts of 2021

Are you wanting to learn more about british literary? Well you’ve come to the right place. This is a curated list of the best british literary podcasts of 2021.

We have selected these podcasts for a variety of reasons, but they are all well worth a listen. We tried to select a variety of podcasts across the spectrum from hosts with a wide breadth of experience.

Best British Literary Podcasts 2021

With thanks to ListenNotes, Crunchbase, SemRush and Ahrefs for providing the data to create and rank these podcasts.

Goblet Of Wine: A Drunken British Harry Potter Podcast

  • Publisher: Harry Potter
  • Total Episodes: 77

Two British lifelong Harry Potter fans Hannah and Charlie re-read their favourite childhood book chapter by chapter with added alcohol and cynicism in fortnightly episodes! The perfect podcast for HP fans who want to revisit the story through an adult lens (AKA, NSFW), and with the added bonus of British accents, Hannah and Charlie lovingly tear apart the books pointing out plot holes, anti-feminist moments, transphobia, fat phobia, and most of all…dick jokes. A unique combination of intelligent literary criticism one minute, and drunken chaos the next, join us on our reminiscent journey.

English Literature

  • Publisher: Myexamsolution
  • Total Episodes: 1

In this podcast you will get all about English Literature , British Literature , Classical Literature , European Drama, Literary Theory, Literary Criticism and many more. English Literature in easy English Language.

The History of England, from the Accession of James the Second by Thomas Babington Macaulay

  • Publisher: Loyal Books
  • Total Episodes: 14

Hailed more as a literary masterpiece than an accurate account of historical facts, The History of England from the Accession of James the Second by Thomas Babington Macaulay is an admirable mix of fact and fiction. Modern day readers may find much that is offensive and insensitive in this five volume work which covers a particular period in the long and eventful history of Britain. However, it is certainly a book that leads the reader on to further research into the events and people mentioned. The book opens with an elaborate and detailed introduction which describes the writer’s motives and reasons for embarking on this project. He goes on to trace the early civilizations that preceded the establishment of the British Monarchy. He credits the British people with resisting all foreign influences beginning with the Romans and going on to the French, Dutch and Germans who had an important role to play in the affairs of the country. The British character and traditions are lauded and commended above all others. This was something which was characteristic of the Victorian age in which Macaulay lived, when the British Empire was at the height of its powers. He was still working on the fifth volume and the reign of William III when he died at the relatively young age of 59. For Macaulay and his contemporaries, Britain at that time represented the zenith of civilization. Macaulay himself was assigned the task of introducing English in British colonies, especially in India. Some of his controversial ideas included dividing the world into “civilization and barbarism” and his contempt of indigenous cultures. His famously insular outlook which he himself took great pride in was something which permeated through all his writings. The History of England… was seen as an essentially Whig representation of events. It inspired a generation of British politicians and thinkers, the most notable among them being Winston Churchill. The philosophy and viewpoint it represents evokes a past era in which the politics of the world was completely different. Macaulay is also famous for having insisted on personally visiting many of the places he describes and thus introducing the concept of social history in addition to a mere political discourse. In spite of all the attacks it received both when it was first published and later, the book remains a highly readable account of the history of the tiny island nation which went on to become a superpower.

Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution by Peter Kropotkin

  • Publisher: Loyal Books
  • Total Episodes: 12

Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution is a book by Peter Kropotkin on the subject of mutual aid, written while he was living in exile in England. It was first published by William Heinemann in London in October 1902. The individual chapters had originally been published in 1890-96 as a series of essays in the British monthly literary magazine, Nineteenth Century. Written partly in response to Social Darwinism and in particular to Thomas H. Huxley’s Nineteenth Century essay, The Struggle for Existence, Kropotkin’s book drew on his experiences in scientific expeditions in Siberia to illustrate the phenomenon of cooperation. After examining the evidence of cooperation in nonhuman animals, “savages,” “barbarians,” in medieval cities, and in modern times, he concludes that cooperation and mutual aid are as important in the evolution of the species as competition and mutual strife, if not more so.

As a Man Thinketh by James Allen

  • Publisher: Loyal Books
  • Total Episodes: 8

“A man is literally what he thinks, his character being the complete sum of all his thoughts,” is one of the quotes from James Allen’s classic self help books, As a Man Thinketh. Published in 1902, it provides many more such insightful concepts on the power of thought and its effect on a human being’s personality and behavior. This volume is more of a literary essay than a complete book and its title is based on a Biblical proverb, “As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he.” Taking this piece of ancient wisdom further, James Allen explores the far-reaching effects of the inner workings of a person’s mind and motivation. He proposes that projecting one’s own desires, goals and needs in the outer world can provide clues to a person’s character. Thinking and the subconscious mind are assumed to be hidden from the outside world, and hence powerless to change the course of events or circumstances of one’s life. However, in this book, Allen presents ideas that can harness this subterranean force and bend our lives to our will if we so choose. James Allen was a British writer who wrote mostly about everyday philosophy for the lay person and was in a sense, a pioneer of the self help movement. His books and poems were inspirational pieces, meant to help people realize their own powers and take charge of their lives rather than being mere tools in the hands of destiny. Born in a working class family in Leicester, England, Allen and his younger brother grew up in straitened circumstances. His father, a factory worker, traveled to America in search of a better job, but was tragically attacked and killed by criminals in New York. James, the older son, was compelled to leave school and seek work back in England. He found employment as a secretary to a stationer and later worked as a journalist. He later discovered a deep and enduring interest in spiritual matters when he began working as a writer with a magazine devoted to spiritual themes. His first book From Poverty to Power was published in 1901. Subsequently, he also launched his own spiritual magazine. As a Man Thinketh was his third and most famous book. It became an instant bestseller and the sales of this tiny volume were so great that they allowed Allen and his family to retire to the country, buy a house and live in relative comfort for the rest of their life. The book’s language is very simple and the message presented here will certainly provide a basis for further thought and meditation.

The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins

  • Publisher: Loyal Books
  • Total Episodes: 48

A young woman who inherits a beautiful diamond known as The Moonstone on her eighteenth birthday becomes the center of this mystery story. The diamond is a gift from an uncle who once served as an army officer in British India. She proudly wears the jewel on her dress at her birthday party that night. The precious stone has a dark and sinister history, which will have a terrible impact on her life and the lives of those around her. You’re about to read what’s been termed the very first real detective story in the English language. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins is the book which is deemed to have set many of the traditions for the generic detective story. Elements like murder in an English country house, plenty of suspects, a famous detective who is called in to solve the crime, a complicated motive and a final twist in the tale as the perpetrator is revealed. The Moonstone was serialized in 1868 in Charles Dickens’ magazine All The Year Round. William Wilkie Collins was an aspiring law student when he first met the great Charles Dickens. Encouraged by the famous author, Collins began to contribute short stories and longer novels to Dickens’ magazines. The two became good friends and often coauthored many pieces in these magazines, read, discussed and traveled together and shared a great literary and personal friendship. However, by the time The Moonstone was written, Collins was suffering from serious ill-health and became addicted to opium, which he began taking to get relief from excruciating pain. The Moonstone was actually a break from the kind of stories Collins had written to that point. The Victorian “sensation” novel genre was all the rage in England at the time, but with The Moonstone, the focus began to shift to mystery, crime and detection. The effects of colonization, looting of local treasures and oppression of the natives are all underlying themes in The Moonstone. As a forerunner of the great traditions of detective fiction, The Moonstone is a gripping, interesting and fascinating read for whodunit fans of all ages.

The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells

  • Publisher: Loyal Books
  • Total Episodes: 27

Extraterrestrial invasion, the earth taken over by omniscient intelligences from Mars, the whole of humanity under siege and a nameless narrator who seems to be the lone survivor of the complete devastation of human civilization – scenes from a Hollywood sci-fi blockbuster? Far from it! The War of the Worlds by HG Wells was written more than a century ago and went on to become an iconic work in the science fiction genre, spawning a whole new genre of literature featuring alien invaders. It was in fact the first book to present the idea of conflict between inhabitants of different planets. The story begins in an observatory in Ottershaw, when scientists note a series of mysterious explosions taking place on Mars. Some days later, the narrator who is on a walk on the Surrey Downs notices a weird cylindrical vehicle that suddenly opens to release a horde of hideous creatures who are later discovered to be Martians. The creatures are unable to breathe Earth’s air and swiftly return to their vehicle. A peace delegation of humans tries to make contact but they’re ruthlessly scorched to death by Martian heat-ray weapons. Thus begins the War of the Worlds. The British military swings into action, but their arms and ammunition are defenseless against sophisticated chemical weapons and heat-rays. Events race towards calamity as the nations of the earth unite to combat these fearful invaders to no avail. Survivors are reduced to scavenging for food with the cities of the world reduced to mere rubble. Can the human race survive? Will the narrator and his family escape destruction? The author, HG Wells was a science teacher in a small village in Somerset, England. However, he was also a gifted writer who wrote in several genres – science fiction, literary novels, short stories, history, politics and social sciences. A keen student of war and combat, he created a set of rules for playing war games with toy soldiers, which provides an interesting glimpse of logistics, strategy and close combat techniques. Wells’ contribution to our ideas of science fiction remains unparalleled and the book has been widely filmed, staged and televised. The War of the Worlds was immortalized as a Halloween prank in a radio show that aired on CBS on October 30, 1938, causing widespread panic and chaos as listeners across the United States tuned in and began fleeing from their homes! The enduring appeal of this book makes it a must read classic for readers of all ages.

RadioBook Rwanda

  • Publisher: RadioBook Rwanda
  • Total Episodes: 10

A new multimedia literary imprint showcasing Rwandan and East African creative voices. There are three innovatively-designed ‘radiobooks’, each featuring the work of one writer and one artist. The accompanying podcasts feature dramatised narrations of the text, as well as interviews with the writers, artists and individuals living similar experiences to those found in the stories. Radiobook Rwanda is the brainchild of three publishers: Huza Press in Kigali, Rwanda, Kwani Trust in Nairobi, Kenya and No Bindings in Bristol in the UK. It is a new Art new Audiences project supported by the British Council’s East Africa Arts Programme.

The Big Idea

  • Publisher: RTHK.HK
  • Total Episodes: 170

Our presenters Douglas Kerr, Vanessa Collingridge and guests explore the history, meaning and significance of ideas in contemporary society. ********************************************************************************* The whole series of the Big idea is available in our podcast station   Podcast: Weekly update and available after its broadcast.  ********************************************************************************* Douglas Kerr Douglas Kerr is Professor in the School of English at the University of Hong Kong, where he teaches courses in literature and rhetoric. He has lived in Hong Kong since 1979. He was born and brought up in Scotland, but went to Cambridge University in 1969 to read Modern Languages and English, and then moved on to the University of Warwick, where he studied English and French literary responses to the First World War, leaving with a PhD in Comparative Literature. During this time, a penurious year working in the French National Library in Paris gave him a taste for living some distance from home. He satisfied this taste by moving to Hong Kong, and has been here ever since. A continuing scholarly interest in the literature of the Great War eventually produced a book on the English war poet Wilfred Owen, and this was published by Oxford University Press in 1993. This was followed by George Orwell, published by Northcote House in their Writers and their Work series. Living first in colonial and then in postcolonial Hong Kong, it is no surprise that he became deeply interested in the way Asia (or the East, or the Orient) was experienced by foreigners, and this became the subject of his next book, Eastern Figures: Orient and Empire in British Writing, published by Hong Kong University Press in 2008. Like many others, Douglas had first encountered the Sherlock Holmes stories as a child, but it was a lot later that he began working on their author, Arthur Conan Doyle. Though he is best known for his detective fiction, Conan Doyle was a prolific writer in all sorts of genres and subjects, and an important figure in the cultural history of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Douglas's book Conan Doyle: Writing, Profession and Practice, to be published by Oxford University Press in 2013, is a “cultural biography” of Conan Doyle and a study of all his writing. Douglas is a regular book reviewer for the South China Morning Post, and was on the Board of the Hong Kong International Literary Festival for five years; he still acts as an Advisor to the Festival. Though Hong Kong is a small place and he has been a resident here for more than thirty years, like other professors he still has a tendency to get lost. Vanessa Collingridge Vanessa graduated from Oxford University in 1990 with a first class honours degree in Geography and started working in television, quickly moving into the field of science, environment and history which remain her passion both on and off screen. Since then, she has been a regular face on all the major UK TV channels (BBC1, BBC2, ITV, Channel 4 and Channel 5), along with Discovery and The Learning Channel (USA) and The History Channel (worldwide). In Spring 2007, she took over the chair of the long-running weekly series Making History, the flagship history series for BBC Radio 4. Her 4x1hr documentary series, Captain Cook – Obsession and Discovery (2007-8) based on her best-selling book, has now won five major international awards including a Canadian “Gemini” (“Oscar”) for Best History Programme, Australia’s prestigious National Culture Award and the Sydney Morning Herald Readers’ Award for Best History Programme. The series has so far been screened in Britain, Australia, New Zealand, North & South America, North Africa and most of Europe. A former columnist for the Daily Telegraph, The Scotsman and BBC History magazine, she writes a monthly column for BBC Who Do You Think You Are magazine along with features for the national newspapers, particularly the Daily Mail, Scotsman and Sunday Herald. A reviewer for The Literary Review, her own books include Captain Cook (2002), Boudica (2005) and The Story of Australia (2008) plus multiple chapters for Thames & Hudson’s Seventy Greatest Journeys in History and The Greatest Explorers in History (2010). Vanessa is currently researching her PhD on the history of cartography of the Great Southern Continent (Antarctica), based at Glasgow University and Cambridge’s Scott Polar Research Institute. She lectures on science, history, geography, presentation skills and the media across the UK, including at Cambridge, Glasgow and Strathclyde Universities, the RGS and the Royal Scottish Geographical Society. She is a Fellow of the RGS and RSGS and co-founder & host of Glasgow’s Café Scientifique to stimulate debate between the scientific community and the general public. She is a regular speaker at Book Festivals including Edinburgh International Book Festival, Cheltenham and Christchurch (New Zealand). She is director of her own production company, Monster Media Productions, which makes radio and television programmes for broadcast and corporate clients; the company also provides a range of training for media and presentation skills. She moved to Hong Kong in November 2010 with her husband and four young sons from where she continues to write and broadcast, and research her PhD.

History of England, from the Accession of James II – (Volume 4, Chapter 19), The by MACAULAY, Thomas…

  • Publisher: LibriVox
  • Total Episodes: 11

This is volume 4 chapter 19 of a series of books written by the Baron Macaulay (1800-1859) in the 19th century. It starts with a brief resume of the history of England up until the Stuart kings and then starts to delve into a little more detail. Macaulay is primarily fascinated by ending of any claim to divine right of kings and the growing role of Parliament in the governing of the country. He sees the accession of William and Mary (Dutch, Protestant royalty) to the British throne as a key moment in the history of the British Isles. This is a book delightful for the literary gifts of the author and intriguing for his view of 18th century English and world politics. (Jim Mowatt)

History of England, from the Accession of James II – (Volume 1, Chapter 01), The by MACAULAY, Thomas…

  • Publisher: LibriVox
  • Total Episodes: 14

This is chapter 1 of volume 1 of a series of books written by the Baron Macaulay in the 19th century. It starts with a brief resume of the history of England up until the Stuart kings and then starts to delve into a little more detail. Macaulay is primarily fascinated by ending of any claim to divine right of kings and the growing role of Parliament in the governing of the country. He sees the accession of William and Mary (Dutch, Protestant royalty) to the British throne as a key moment in the history of the British Isles. This is a book delightful for the literary gifts of the author and intriguing for his view of 18th century English and world politics. (Summary by Jim Mowatt)

Plain Tales from the Hills by KIPLING, Rudyard

  • Publisher: LibriVox
  • Total Episodes: 35

Named a “prophet of British imperialism” by the young George Orwell, and born in Bombay, India, Rudyard Kipling had perhaps the clearest contemporary eye of any who described the British Raj. According to critic Douglas Kerr: “He is still an author who can inspire passionate disagreement and his place in literary and cultural history is far from settled. But as the age of the European empires recedes, he is recognised as an incomparable, if controversial, interpreter of how empire was experienced. That, and an increasing recognition of his extraordinary narrative gifts, make him a force to be reckoned with.” This force shines in THE PLAIN TALES FROM THE HILLS. — MH . (Introduction by Mike Harris)

Our Island Story by Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall

  • Publisher: Loyal Books
  • Total Episodes: 55

Tailored specially to make history more palatable and interesting to children, Our Island Story, by Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall, is a charmingly illustrated volume that promises hours of delight for parents as well as children. Beginning with the myths and legends about Albion, the author ensures that she captivates the child’s imagination from the very first page. Unlike today’s dry and non-committal history tomes that are prescribed in schools, Our Island Story is full of lyrical prose, literary allusions, heroic and tragic characters, the hunger for power and the glory of empire. There are strong elements of folklore, fairy tales, popular legends and a sense of the dramatic. It renders history full of the people who made Britain what it is today and gives modern readers a glimpse into what went into the creation of the once invincible British Empire. Our Island Story was first published in 1905. The period it covers begins with the Roman Occupation of Britain and ends with the Victorian Era. Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall utilizes a fascinating blend of fact and mythology to create a composite picture peopled by colorful characters, driven by ambition, honor, greed or lust to wield power over their fellow men. Wars and rebellions, assassinations and assignations, explorers and extremists, religion and romance are all wonderfully captured in this superbly constructed book. For young readers, Our Island Story presents what could be a mere succession of dry dates and titles in a memorable and engaging form. Older readers would find that the conversion of history into something that is vivid, dramatic and human makes them appreciate how present events have been shaped by the past. Our Island Story (originally titled Our Island Story: A History of England for Boys and Girls) was an instant best-seller when it first came out and has remained a popular choice for schools, libraries and individual readers. The author, Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall was a writer of children’s books and nothing much is known about her personal life. Some critics have pointed out that there are many historical inaccuracies in her writings and she often relied on unorthodox sources for her information. However, it cannot be denied that her writing style is extremely attractive, easy and gives the reader that much needed push to further research, which is what every good book should do. Children as young as nine would be able to read this book on their own, while younger ones would enjoy a read aloud with parents.

Modern and Contemporary French Literature: History, Criticism, Theory

  • Publisher: Antoine Compagnon
  • Total Episodes: 72

Antoine Compagnon, born on July 20, 1950 in Brussels, has been professor of “Modern and Contemporary French Literature: history, criticism, and theory” at the Collège de France since 2006. He has also been Professor of French and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York since 1985, holding the “Blanche W. Knopf” chair since 1991. Formerly a student at the École Polytechnique (1970), and an engineer from the Ponts et Chaussées engineering school (1975), he was awarded a PhD in arts in 1985. His most important publications include: La Seconde Main ou le travail de la citation (Seuil, 1979), Nous, Michel de Montaigne (Seuil, 1980), La Troisième République des Lettres (Seuil, 1983), Proust entre deux siècles (Seuil, 1989), Les Cinq Paradoxes de la modernité (Seuil, 1990), L’Esprit de l’Europe, (collaboration) (Flammarion, 1993), Chat en poche : Montaigne et l’allégorie (Seuil, 1993), Connaissez‐vous Brunetière? (Seuil, 1997), Le Démon de la théorie (Seuil, 1998), Baudelaire devant l’innombrable (PUPS, 2003), Les Antimodernes, de (Gallimard, 2005), the Pierre‐Georges Castex Prize from the Académie des sciences morales et politiques (French Academy of Ethical and Political Sciences), Criticism prize of the Académie française (French Academy), La Littérature, pour quoi faire? (Collège de France/Fayard, 2007), Que reste‐t‐il de la culture française ?, (collaboration) (Denoël, 2008), Le Cas Bernard Faÿ. Du Collège de France à l’indignité nationale (Gallimard, 2009). He has also published editions of Proust, Du côté de chez Swann (Gallimard, “Folio”, 1988), Sodome et Gomorrhe (Gallimard, “Pléiade”, 1988, and “Folio”, 1989), Carnets, , (collaboration) (Gallimard, 2002); Albert Thibaudet, Réflexions sur la politique (Robert Laffont, “Bouquins”, 2007), Réflexions sur la littérature (Gallimard, “Quarto”, 2007); Charles Péguy, L’Argent (Éd. des Équateurs, 2008); Paul Bourget, Le Disciple (Le Livre de Poche, 2010). He was a Thiers Foundation resident (1975‐1978), assistant professor at the École polytechnique (1978‐1985), professor at the Institut français du Royaume-Uni (French Cultural Institute in the UK), London (1980‐1981), lecturer and then assistant professor at the University of Haute Normandie, Rouen (1981‐1985), visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (1986 and 1990), Fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (1988), professor at the University of Maine, Le Mans (1989‐1990), Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford (1994), professor at the University of Paris IV-Sorbonne (1994‐2006), and Eminent Scientist of the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science (2009). He has held the office of secretary general of the Association internationale des études françaises (International Association of French Studies) (1998‐2008), and has been a member of the Conseil national des universités (French National Council of Universities) (1999‐2003), of the Conseil supérieur de l’enseignement supérieur et de la recherche (National Council of Higher Education and Research) (2002‐2007), of the Conseil supérieur de l’éducation (Higher Council for Education) (2003‐2007), as well as Chairman of the Association pour la qualité de la science française (Association for the Quality of French Science), Chairman of the Scientific Committee at the École normale supérieure (ENS) (2007‐2010) and Chairman of the Classic Literature and Literary Criticism committee at the Centre national du livre (National Book Center) (2008‐2010). He has been a member of the Haut Conseil de l’éducation (High Council for Education) since 2006, a member of the Haut Conseil de la science et de la technologie (High Council of Science and Technology) since 2006, and director of UPS 3285 “République des lettres” (The Republic of Literature) at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS, or French National Center for Scientific Research) since 2009. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Academia Europaea, corresponding member of the British Academy, and Doctor honoris causa of King’s College, London. He is also a Knight of the Legion of Honor and Commander of the Academic Awards.

Alexander McCall Smith

  • Publisher: Academy of Achievement
  • Total Episodes: 2

To date, Alexander McCall Smith has written more than 60 books, including everything from children’s stories to legal textbooks, but he is best known for his delightful series, No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency, featuring the African sleuth, Precious Ramotswe. The ninth and latest installment, Tea Time for the Traditionally Built, appeared this year. The series has now been translated into 39 languages and has sold over 7 million copies worldwide. Smith was born in what is now Zimbabwe, and educated there and in Scotland. He returned to Africa to establish a new law school at the University of Botswana in Gaborone, the setting of the No. 1 Ladies series. For many years he was Professor of Medical Law at the University of Edinburgh. In addition to his literary activities, he is a past Vice Chairman of the Human Genetics Commission of the United Kingdom and Chairman of the British Medical Journal Ethics Committee. In 2007, he was named a Commander of the British Empire for his services to literature. This two-part podcast was recorded in the Boulders Lodge of the Singita Sabi Sands Game Reserve during the 2009 International Achievement Summit.

PoemUp

  • Publisher: Alexander
  • Total Episodes: 2

Spoken poems and poetry British English Literary criticism and analysis ASMR Meditation Calming reflections for troubled times

Rainbows by Olive Custance (1874 – 1944)

  • Publisher: LibriVox
  • Total Episodes: 42

At age 16, London blueblood Olive Custance already figured in literary circles shared by Oscar Wilde and John Gray. She later wrote for the “Yellow Book”, a notorious British quarterly of the late 1890’s, featuring poems, essays, short stories and artwork by many well-known writers and artists of the age. In 1902 she married Lord Alfred ‘Bosie’ Douglas, famed for his relationship with Oscar Wilde. Opals, her first published poetry collection, appeared in 1897 when she was just 23, to be followed by Rainbows (1902), The Blue Bird (1905) and The Inn of Dreams (1911). – Summary by Nemo

History of England, from the Accession of James II – (Volume 4, Chapter 22), The by MACAULAY, Thomas…

  • Publisher: LibriVox
  • Total Episodes: 12

This is volume 4 chapter 22 of a series of books written by the Baron Macaulay (1800-1859) in the 19th century. It starts with a brief resume of the history of England up until the Stuart kings and then starts to delve into a little more detail. Macaulay is primarily fascinated by ending of any claim to divine right of kings and the growing role of Parliament in the governing of the country. He sees the accession of William and Mary (Dutch, Protestant royalty) to the British throne as a key moment in the history of the British Isles. This is a book delightful for the literary gifts of the author and intriguing for his view of 18th century English and world politics. (Jim Mowatt)

History of England, from the Accession of James II – (Volume 4, Chapter 21), The by MACAULAY, Thomas…

  • Publisher: LibriVox
  • Total Episodes: 14

This is volume 4 chapter 21 of a series of books written by the Baron Macaulay (1800-1859) in the 19th century. It starts with a brief resume of the history of England up until the Stuart kings and then starts to delve into a little more detail. Macaulay is primarily fascinated by ending of any claim to divine right of kings and the growing role of Parliament in the governing of the country. He sees the accession of William and Mary (Dutch, Protestant royalty) to the British throne as a key moment in the history of the British Isles. This is a book delightful for the literary gifts of the author and intriguing for his view of 19th century English and world politics.(Jim Mowatt)

History of England, from the Accession of James II – (Volume 3, Chapter 16), The by MACAULAY, Thomas…

  • Publisher: LibriVox
  • Total Episodes: 11

This is volume 3 chapter 16 of a series of books written by the Baron Macaulay (1800-1859) in the 19th century. It starts with a brief resume of the history of England up until the Stuart kings and then starts to delve into a little more detail. Macaulay is primarily fascinated by ending of any claim to divine right of kings and the growing role of Parliament in the governing of the country. He sees the accession of William and Mary (Dutch, Protestant royalty) to the British throne as a key moment in the history of the British Isles. This is a book delightful for the literary gifts of the author and intriguing for his view of 18th century English and world politics. (Jim Mowatt)

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